Not your grandmother’s yearly plan (unless your grandma is WAY AWESOME)

SO yesterday was a lot of semi-sensible-sounding sleep-and-diet, writing-and-practice stuff…but don't let that fool you; I still highly value the *other* kind of planning too, the kind that just lets it all explode out and let's see what sticks.  Therefore, lest anyone think I’m not also doing good old-fashioned completely batshit planning in addition to the (for me) sane and well-considered planning of yesterday, I present…

JANUARY 2’s CONFESSIONS

The nice thing about a slow period — you've got to have them, and if I'm not careful I hate them, but — it IS nice that they give you lots of time to make crazy plans.  To make ALL the planz, and then gear yourself up to hit the tarmac at 200 knots and see what you can do.  When things are busy, you just grab the ropes as they swing by; it's when they're slow (like over a holiday) that you get to set things up and try to put some future ropes (mental or physical or financial) in the right places so you can make all those amazing leaps you're really hoping for.

Like… 

 

I’ve started collaborating with someone I know on buying a plane.

 

Yup.  A plane.  My goal is to have a private license in the coming year, so that within 2-3 years I can be flying the plane around on a speaking / signing tour, macking my own travel expenses while simultaneously racking up miles for my commercial license.

 

Yup, speaking and signing tour.  For Ubersleep 2, you know.  It’s about…half done, I’d say, though of course I may yet add a lot more in the two years I’m giving myself to finish it.

 

I’m also traveling with my husband in the coming years; we’ve decided it’s stupid to put it off, and anyway we’re still owed (by ourselves) a honeymoon.  Travel will eventually be made much easier by the plane, but we’re not planning to wait for it…if money allows, we’ve decided to be brave and just get out there.  Tokyo/Akihabara, Kyoto, China/Wudang Mountain, Romania, Jamaica, Venice, and lots more are on the list.  (Fortunately we’re hoping to have another 40+ years to work on the list! ;)

 

Yup.

 

Oh yes, and I'm writing songs and teaching myself to sing with accompaniment finally…another goal is to have at least one performable song in the next few months, and publish one by the end of this year!

 

I’ve also got singing, dancing and cooking lessons on the hook for when there's money, plus a possible Mandarin language tutor…

 

Darnit, I was really hoping to conclude that this was not, in fact, an utterly ridiculous plan.

 

Hm.

 

You know what?  Imma conclude that anyway, just because I can and none of you can actually prove me wrong.  Yay!

 

VIVA LAS MANIA, lol.

 

 

 

About puredoxyk

Word addict, kungfu/taiji nut, and life-partner to polyphasic sleep. Rabid fan of as many hobbies as the world will let me pry into its piddly fourth dimension (it helps to have knocked out the fourth wall).
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2 Responses to Not your grandmother’s yearly plan (unless your grandma is WAY AWESOME)

  1. john says:

    hoping you still help others with polyphasic questions:
    i'm going into my 5th day of my uberman adaption and yesterday to stay awake i went out for some fresh air. stupidly i went out into the garden for around 1/2 hour in the cold in my slippers, the floor was also wet from earlier rain.
    i now have a sore throat and am having trouble stopping sneezing. i have continued my uberman attempt for another 3 sleeps so far putting tissue up my nose so i stop sneezing and can get some sleep. the sore throat sweets i'm taking seem to effect my naps a little but i am still getting some rem in my naps.
    i am surviving so far, but will this cold clear up while still in adaption – current time on schedule = 104 hours

  2. Jerry says:

    I, too, wanted to learn Mandarin, because it's impossibly complex. It's like solving the hardest jigsaw puzzle in the whole wide world.
    Adult learners were able to achieve near-native fluency by using a little-known,  revolutionary new method. I think you'll find it interesting, PD:
    http://algworld.com/

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